Multiple tattoos can boost immune system, help prevent common cold: Study

By Steve Pak, | March 14, 2016

Tattoo

Tattoo

Getting multiple tattoos can help to improve a person's immune system like a vaccination and help to prevent illnesses such as the common cold based on a new study. People have a lower immunity after getting their first tattoo but getting more colored designs on skin helps to boost their immune system and can prevent them from getting sick.  

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The study was conducted at Alabama University and was published in the American Journal of Human Biology.

Researchers collected saliva samples from 29 people. After they measured and evaluated the levels of the antibody immunoglobulin A (IgA) and hormone cortisol the scientists learned that people who got their first tattoo had lower IgA and cortisol levels compared to people with more than one tattoo.    

Researchers learned that tattoos might activate the immune system. In turn that helps the body to defend against disease-causing organisms in the future, according to Tampa Bay Review.

Getting tattoos seems to have the same effect as exercising. In that case the body becomes very tired the first time, but get stronger during future workout sessions.  

The researchers explained there are two main implications. One is that people who have more tattoo experience are more excited and less anxious about a tattoo session, so their immune system is stronger. Another idea is that people with multiple tattoos have lower IgA suppression like athletes whose bodies get used to high-intensity exercise stress as time passes.

In addition, the study seems to suggest that getting an ink tattoo boosts immunity, but the study included a small sample size so it is unclear if that is the true.

One of the researchers suggested that people should not get a tattoo just to improve their immune system since there are other health risks involved. They include the chance of scaring, infection, and psychological effects.

A study published last November showed that loneliness affects the immune system and can cause illness, according to Medical News Today. It built on another study that showed very lonely people are 14 percent more likely to experience early death.

In the new study researchers studied the white blood cells of people aged 50 to 68. Very lonely people's blood cells were linked to conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA).

Here are some top foods to boost immune system:




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