Aspirin may Provide Little or no Benefit for Certain Patients with Plaque Buildup in Arteries, Researchers Find

By KM Diaz, | June 06, 2017

Researchers from the University of Florida Health found that aspirin may only provide little or no benefit at all for some patients with plaque build-up in arteries. (YouTube)

Researchers from the University of Florida Health found that aspirin may only provide little or no benefit at all for some patients with plaque build-up in arteries. (YouTube)

Aspirin has been used to decrease the risk of certain cardiovascular problems. However, a new study led by the researchers from the University of Florida Health found that aspirin may only provide little or no benefit at all for some patients with plaque build-up in arteries.

Like Us on Facebook

Researchers analyzed the medical histories of patients with atherosclerosis, in which aspirin is marginally beneficial for those who have had previous blood-flow issues in arteries, stroke, or heart attack, and had no benefit for those atherosclerosis participants without prior stroke or heart attack.  

Anthony Bavry, M.D., a cardiologist at the Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Gainesville, said that their findings are observational, meaning further research is still needed to confirm whether aspirin provides little or no benefit to certain atherosclerosis patients.

Those who are involved in the nationwide study were at least 45 years of age with peripheral vascular disease, coronary artery disease, and cerebrovascular disease, in which their medical information was obtained in late 2003 and mid-2009.
 
Researchers found that among the 21,000 patients who had a previous stroke or heart attack, the risk of subsequent cardiovascular death was marginally lower with aspirin users, while aspirin seemed to provide no effect for patients who had not experienced a stroke or heart attack. Overall, the risk of heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular death was 10.5 percent for aspirin non-users and 10.7 percent with aspirin users.

Researchers also identified that those who had coronary bypass without any history of arterial blood-flow condition, stroke, and heart attack gained some benefit from aspirin. Bavry suggests that these patients should stick with aspirin regimen.

Lastly, Bavry warned atherosclerosis patients or those who have peripheral vascular disease not to quit their therapy on aspiring on their own, the matter should be discussed with physician.

The study was published in the journal Clinical Cardiology. 

©2017 Telegiz All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission
Real Time Analytics